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In humans, there is this concept of general intelligence, which says that if someone is smarter than you then they are smarter than you at all activities that rely on intelligences.

Do other animals also have general intelligences? Or do their brains simply specialize in one area of intelligence. So for example, dogs are considered smarter than cats because they are better at being trained to do stuff. Does that mean that dogs are smarter than cats in all activities that require intelligences, or are dogs simply better at this one thing, which is following instructions from a human?

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    $\begingroup$ "which says that if someone is smarter than you then they are smarter than you at all activities that relies on intelligence" - that's not what general intelligence is or does. General intelligence is the idea that scores on different tests of intelligence are correlated; that's it. It doesn't really make sense to apply it to species differences. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause May 2 at 3:39
  • $\begingroup$ Also see Have IQ-type measures been tried for other animals? Also, this post I think answers your question, but unfortunately, the corresponding question is closed. $\endgroup$ – Arnon Weinberg May 2 at 6:02

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