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I know that traumatic stress as an infant can cause serious developmental problems down the line, especially regarding attachment styles and identity development. But I'm wondering if that extends to relatively brief periods of infant trauma, especially if they are followed by an otherwise normal childhood.

For example, say a one-year-old baby is placed in daycare, where they become so distressed by the separation and the unfamiliar environment that they begin to show signs of psychological trauma. The parents eventually notice their baby is not doing well, and take them out of daycare after a month.

If their parents are loving and attentive, and they have a normal childhood from then on, is it reasonable to think their traumatic experience as an infant might still permanently affect their mental health beyond infancy (i.e. as a child, adolescent, or even adult)? Would they still be considered at risk for conditions related to developmental trauma, such as dissociative disorders?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Psychology.SE. "The parents eventually notice their baby is not doing well, and take them out of daycare after a month." A month of any trauma is not particularly brief in my view. What have you read about attachment theory and particularly disorganised attachment? While infants form strong attachments to their parents, it is often observed that they do form attachments to other caregivers. $\endgroup$ – Chris Rogers Apr 20 at 12:56

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