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I have studied that Gestalt Principles are principles/laws of human perception that describe how humans group similar elements, recognize patterns, and simplify complex images when we perceive objects. But can you give me real-life examples where this is applicable in day-to-day life not just looking at some patterns in the textbook.

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    $\begingroup$ While reading this comment, you could say the Gestalt principle of proximity is at play when you recognize a sentence as groups of words. $\endgroup$
    – Steven Jeuris
    Mar 16 '21 at 9:55
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    $\begingroup$ It's still a toy example, but one you can try out right now, in the real world. If you take two pens, hold one over the other perpendicularly, your brain will perceive two straight pens, instead of some weird pen shaped like a cross, or two bent pens. This is the Gestalt principle of good continuation at play. $\endgroup$
    – David Cian
    Mar 16 '21 at 10:56
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Perhaps seeing where it fails will help with understanding.

Consider Forced-Perspective Photography, where the gestalt effect causes your brain to see a false vision of what is actually there.

A hand holding a spray can, a sky with fluffy clouds; together the clouds appear to be coming from the spray can.

A large crane appears to be lifting or placing the Washington Monument.

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One area where Gestalt principles are widely applied is in graphic design: for instance, for logo design. Moving to a field that's a bit bigger, Gestalt principles are also used to guide web design processes.

If you're asking not about utilitarian, "artificial" applications of Gestalt theory, but about examples of where it comes into play during day-to-day life, Gestalt principles improve the correctness of how we interpret visual information. For instance, the principle of good continuation dictates that when you see a car partly covered by a tree so that you see two distinct fragments of it, your brain still perceives it as one car and not just two separate car fragments.

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