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I have an undergraduate degree in psychology and I'm currently pursuing a master's degree in a different field. However, I am still interested in many aspects of psychology, including personality psychology. During my undergrad, I took two courses on personality, one dealing with personality at large, and one dealing with psychopathology. I'm looking for a more advanced book on personality psychology to read over the summer, perhaps a textbook that is read as part of a postgraduate degree in personality psychology. I'm not interested in psychopathology. Any recommendations?

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The best place to start is probably THE personality psychologist, Gordon Allport. He wrote several texts that give a good overview of the issues facing the investigation of personality. He gives a fairly critical look at defining and measuring personality. Highly recommended reading if you plan on delving into personality theory.

His books on the topic:

Personality: A psychological interpretation. (1937) New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.

Becoming: Basic Considerations for a Psychology of Personality. (1955). New Haven : Yale University Press.

The Nature of Personality: Selected Papers. (1950; 1975). Westport, CN : Greenwood Press.

The Person in Psychology (1968). Boston: Beacon Press

The Psychologist's Frame of Reference (1940).

Pattern and Growth in Personality. (1961). Harcourt College Pub.

Personality & social encounter. (1960). Boston: Beacon Press.

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  • $\begingroup$ Isn't that a little too old? I imagine that personality is a dynamic field that has evolved quite a bit since the middle of the 20th century. $\endgroup$ – postnubilaphoebus Jun 13 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ This is true and the approach that Allport takes in his works, viewing personality as something that cant really be clustered and predicted upon, but points out the dynamic interactions of the individual and their present environments and circumstances. I think it would still be relevant even with the development of the Big Five and similar modern approaches in the investigation of personality. $\endgroup$ – Psychm Jun 13 at 16:28

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