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During our university studies, our lecturer set up a group of people to perform a task. It was obviously supposed to follow the Tuckman's model of the group forming [Forming – Storming – Norming – Performing], however, on the Norming form a new member joined the group that had lead to the model's dissonance.

Do you think that in general, it had pushed the group back to the Forming point and how could this affect further studies? Can it led the whole group to waste time on forming and how can new people effectively join other groups that are on the Norming stage?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Arnon Weinberg Oct 13 at 13:34

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ As evidence has shown, phrasing such as "Do you think" is likely to attract opinion-based answers. Additionally, this question appears to be about an individual scenario, which is off-topic on this forum. Please rephrase the question so as to solicit evidence-based answers instead. $\endgroup$ – Arnon Weinberg Oct 13 at 13:34
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  The group has been kicked back to the forming phase, but it is already partly consolidated, due to that the process is rather accepting the new member than going through all of the same steps again. Yes, it indeed is the forming of some kind, but not completely the one described in Tuckman's model. Due to experience in making connections with each other, group can go through forming and storming phases faster than it had in the first time. Further studies could be slowed down for a while, but if the storming phase goes smooth, the work tempo is reclaimed pretty fast as well.

  To effectively join the group in norming stage, all one can do is try not to roll it back to the forming stage nor to make an existing group go through the same process all over again for a long time. Of course problems are inevitable if he is unacquainted to group's members or has problems with social adaptation (extra time might be spent to comfort him) but yet possible. The most problematic part is the storming stage, during that phase a new member must be as less conflicting as possible in order to maintain the group's stability.

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In that type of situation, if a new member joins the group who is not familiar with the topic and with no one from the group, then in fact the group itself is frozen at the Norming point stage. The process is frozen at the Norming point, and not rolled back to the previous ones, because the initial composition of the group: they know each other well, they know what to do and how to do to complete the task. The group only needs to bring the new member up to date, and the new member to meet his new colleagues. Further, the process of completing the task, in most cases, depends on the new participant, how he will join the team and how he will work in it. However, one should not exclude the possibility that the initial team should be obliged to tell well what they have already achieved and honestly redistribute responsibilities. Failure to do this kind of thing on the part of the original composition of the group and the new member of the group threatens to slow down the process of the completing the task.

New members of the group who join the group at the Norming stage, they need to show that they are ready to work in a team on this task. They need to carefully study what the group has already done, what it plans to do, and thus slowly become part of the team. There was a case when a new member was added to the group in which I was a member. We met, said who is looking for and writes in our general report, showed and told what we have already done and what plans to do. The new participant listened attentively to us, got acquainted with the material already written, helped edit what was there and looked for new information for the general report.

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