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Can the human brain track an accelerating object?

By track I mean change your focus in real-time such that the accelerating object appears in focus.

Is the answer 'no' because accelerating objects aren't predictable? (The brain would have to be able to compute acceleration in real time. If it can't track something then wouldn't that be a state a panic resulting in triggering threat detection.

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put on hold as off-topic by Bryan Krause, Steven Jeuris Apr 16 at 20:05

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    $\begingroup$ What's the basis of this question? The answer is obviously and uninterestingly "yes" - if we couldn't, roadways would be extremely more dangerous, any sport with a ball would be impossible, etc. Computing acceleration in real time isn't particularly difficult, why is that an issue? What does any of this have to do with "threat detection"? What would threat detection have to do with not being able to track something? $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Apr 16 at 16:08
  • $\begingroup$ What would be the reaction if you couldn't track something? (What other reaction would there be but threat detection?) $\endgroup$ – Randy Zeitman Apr 16 at 17:17
  • $\begingroup$ What do you even mean by "couldn't track"? $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Apr 16 at 17:19
  • $\begingroup$ What would be the reaction if you couldn't track something? (What other reaction would there be but threat detection?) I've attempted to clarify the question. Sports are certainly possible without having full-focus on the ball. I play tennis ... even when the ball is close it appears as a blur - it's not necessary to have the ball in full-focus to accurately infer its path. $\endgroup$ – Randy Zeitman Apr 16 at 17:24
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    $\begingroup$ Do you think something besides your brain is inferring that path? Sounds like "tracking" to me. If you're thinking about something accelerating towards your face, yeah, that would be detected as a threat: because you are tracking an object coming towards your face, not because you are "not tracking" it. I still don't understand what your question is trying to get at, and I suspect you may have an XY problem here where you have an actual underlying question that is not explicitly stated in your question. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Apr 16 at 17:26

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