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I'm not a psychologist nor a psychiatrist, but I have the impression that research of therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs (MDMA, LSD, DMT, etc) is undergoing a revival and is very slowly being accepted by the medical establishment.

Are there introductory books covering this topic which are scientifically credible?

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    $\begingroup$ The word you want is probably "psychedelic" rather than "psychoactive" - psychoactive just means that it has some effect on the brain/mental activity. Caffeine is psychoactive, allergy medication is psychoactive, etc. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Oct 5 '18 at 15:41
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    $\begingroup$ I removed the subjective 'good' part and emphasized the request for a 'popular science' (introductory level) book, which might make this question focused enough. I will leave it up to the community to decide on that. $\endgroup$ – Steven Jeuris Oct 6 '18 at 10:58
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    $\begingroup$ P.s. in case you have any sources you could link to clarify where this impression you have comes from, that would improve this question (would help attracting some up votes!) $\endgroup$ – Steven Jeuris Oct 6 '18 at 11:00
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Yes, the psychedelic Renaissance/ third wave (as I've heard it being called) is steadily gaining momentum. I almost feel like mentioning How to Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan here is too obvious, but just to be safe, here's a few links and a cultural review. There is also an exhaustive summary on Trippingly.net!

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Although there may be books written, your best bet for reading up on a changing field is to read some recent review articles.

Google Scholar is a good place to find such articles, for example you can search for "review psychedelic therapy" or substitute in a particular drug of interest. You can also select a recent year range if you want the newest sources.

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_ylo=2014&q=review+psychedelic+therapy

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    $\begingroup$ The OP Is asking for an 'introductory' book, which I interpreted as 'popular science'. I imagine a review article does not fall under that category. :) $\endgroup$ – Steven Jeuris Oct 6 '18 at 11:03
  • $\begingroup$ @StevenJeuris "Pop science" was your edit, not the OP, they just asked for a book, and they didn't talk much about their background. Review articles can be quite accessible, even to scientific novices, given they are interested in the topic. I see no reason to be afraid of scientific literature. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Oct 11 '18 at 15:48
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    $\begingroup$ Fair enough. I just narrowed down the question, in line with what I perceived the OP was after, so it would not attract further down/close votes (list-like questions such as this are tricky). P.s. I did not down vote. $\endgroup$ – Steven Jeuris Oct 12 '18 at 2:30

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