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I was researching social cues and stumbled upon this article, which concludes that:

results suggest that implicit learning is context-dependent and can be influenced by the cue type, e.g., social and object cues.

Now, that is not surprising at all, the findings that learning is context-dependent, meaning that relevant social cues improve it. However, what if the subject has to learn how to react to social cues? Say we are talking about individuals that for various reasons, (let's say, social isolation growing up or as one symptom of a disorder or other) do not know how to react to most social cues, or to more complex ones? How do you train them, given that, as adults, exposure in a cvasi-controlled environment (like school) is not possible?

I guess my question is: In adult learning, would it be possible to train people to understand or react to social cues, taking into account that you need to make the training context-dependent? *

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Yes. The first step in teaching others to recognize and how to respond to social cues is to help them learn self-awareness. They need to become aware of how they feel and naturally respond to stimuli. People with ASD often struggle with having a detached look of themselves- ToM. That too someone can overcome through self-awareness. Google scholar self-awareness and social competence.

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  • $\begingroup$ I would have preferred more specific recommendations or examples of findings for further reading, but the perspective you recommended really breaks down the problem to something that is manageable, thank you. I will use the keywords you provided for my research. +1 and answer accepted. $\endgroup$ – OMan Jun 1 '18 at 9:19

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