0
$\begingroup$
  • I would like to know what the branches of neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, and psychiatry related to what happens when the tongue touches and other possible related mouth sensors, touch, or come into touch, with food, in the mouth, possibly interacting, with saliva and salivary glands and allocation, the back of the tongue and the back part of the hard palate or soft palate, the uvula, and swallowing and interaction with the tongue while swallowing and peristalsis through the throat, other than the feeling one gets when food is being digested by the stomach, gallbladder, and bowls, and related cognitive processes and psychology.

  • Also, what are the food and sense of taste disorders described in the DSM V?

  • What are the interactions of attachment theory with these processes?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Short answer / Intro
This question is (superbly) broad, and I've merely attempted to try to give some pointers, without even trying to be complete in any way.

Background

I would like to know what the branches of neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, and psychiatry related to what happens when the tongue touches...

In terms of disorders, Hummel et al (2014) say:

These functions reflect the complaints of patients with smell and taste disorders: Patient complaints include loss of “fine taste”, inability to detect the odour of a partner or child, and the occurrence of, for example, food poisoning. In general the value of these senses is only recognised when they are lost. It is assumed that about 5% of people exhibit functional anosmia.

Anosmia being:

the loss of the sense of smell, either total or partial. It may be caused by head injury, infection, or blockage of the nose.

In terms of psychiatric illness I'm moving into unfamiliar territory, but there seems to be mention in the literature of a correlation between taste dysfunction and psychiatric disorders (Mott et al., 1993)

References
- Hummel et al., GMS Curr Top Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2011); 10: Doc04
- Mott et al, Dental Clinics North Am (1993); 37(1): 33-71

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ +1 from me. Can you please provide a reference for Hummel et al.? $\endgroup$ – Chris Rogers May 24 '18 at 9:44
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Chris sure thing. $\endgroup$ – AliceD May 24 '18 at 10:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.