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I’m looking for resources about the relaxation training component of CBT. I had a professor who spent a good deal of time on it in class, but I’m no longer attending that school and he’s notoriously unresponsive to email. I’m looking for anything about the technique as used in cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Our professor did mention The Relaxation Response, a book published in the ‘70s, was the basis for the type he was teaching about.

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  • $\begingroup$ Were there any recommended reading materials suggested when enrolling on the CBT training you are talking about? Maybe you could start there $\endgroup$ – Chris Rogers Mar 19 '18 at 23:07
  • $\begingroup$ @Chris The course was a broad overview of many types of therapy across a single semester. There’s one recommended book on CBT in general, but it doesn’t cover relaxation training in particular. He spent one full class period on relaxation and a few more on CBT, integrating relaxation into all of it, but the entirety of the CBT portion of the course was three weeks at most. $\endgroup$ – Zenon Mar 19 '18 at 23:29
  • $\begingroup$ I am sorry but there are a wide range of relaxation techniques which can be used within CBT and unless you are able to be specific on the name of the technique it is hard to give any help $\endgroup$ – Chris Rogers Mar 19 '18 at 23:37
  • $\begingroup$ @Chris He did mention The Relaxation Response, a book published in the ‘70s, was the basis for the type he was teaching about. $\endgroup$ – Zenon Mar 20 '18 at 0:47
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As I mentioned previously in the comments, there are a wide range of relaxation techniques which can be used within CBT. Having not read the book mentioned, I looked it up and found how the relaxation technique was described in the book.

From this I can tell you that the technique you have been taught is called Progressive Muscle Relaxation [PMR] (McCallie, Blum, & Hood, 2006).

PMR involves the process of feeling the muscles in your body relax starting from one end of the body to the other, noticing the difference in sensation whilst also listening to your slow deep breathing.

You can obtain plenty of free or paid for PMR scripts (also known as screeds) through searching on Google.

References

McCallie, M. S., Blum, C. M., & Hood, C. J. (2006). Progressive muscle relaxation. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 13(3), 51-66.
DOI: 10.1300/J137v13n03_04

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