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I read that psychological inquiry can be analogized to the work done by physicists long ago before modern sophisticated theories, such as electromagnetism. According to the argument, psychologists could be thought of as researchers living in the 1800s trying to understand how a present-day laptop works with ideas of electricity, but no electric theory, no computer science, etc. Only able to see how it reacts to certain things.

I have heard this argument in other places as well and am attempting to discover if this is a fair comparison and if psychology really needs a complete neurobiology for one to gain a deep and comprehensive understanding of the human condition.

Does anyone know of any good articles or books in philosophy of psychology/science, that discuss the varying perspectives on this question?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by mfloren, AliceD Jun 8 '17 at 8:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Hello and thanks for the question! A question such as "is this a fair comparison" is really hard to answer objectively (a goal of the site), and may be a better fit for a discussion board setting (which SE is not). $\endgroup$ – mfloren Jun 8 '17 at 16:14
  • $\begingroup$ FYI made a change $\endgroup$ – Jonesn11 Jun 11 '17 at 22:51
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you! Do you mind citing where you read this? $\endgroup$ – mfloren Jun 12 '17 at 2:24