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I was getting in the old round corners vs square corners conversation and the majority of arguments for rounded corners revolve around our subconscious desire for natural round things over artificial angles. Then they give the terrible analogy of a fork vs a ball.

As I was considering this I thought if there is an innate bias toward circular objects, it should be apparent in young children as well. So I thought the easiest way to test this was to put a block and a ball of the same size in the same room and observe with which object a baby chooses to interact. Assuming the hypothesis about subconscious choice is right, these babies should display a preference for the ball over the block.

Has anyone heard of any studies that investigate this sort of thing?

http://uxmovement.com/thinking/why-rounded-corners-are-easier-on-the-eyes/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16913943

https://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/11150/how-do-rounded-corners-affect-usability

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to CogSci. Is this round corner, square corner argument commonly encountered? Could you link a source perhaps? A web page maybe? $\endgroup$ – AliceD May 5 '17 at 18:02
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    $\begingroup$ Added a couple links, I would say it is constantly encountered in design along with a lot of established dogma. I am just interested in how much of this is truly innate vs learned behavior. $\endgroup$ – Jackie May 6 '17 at 1:16

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