8
$\begingroup$

In the book Man and His Symbols Jung discusses the Anima and Animus extensively. As I understand it they are the two primary anthropomorphic archetypes of the collective unconscious. The Anima is expressed as the inner feminine personality in the unconscious of man; the Animus as the inner masculine personality of the unconscious of female

I found it strange that Jung only talks about the Anima in terms of the male psyche, and the Animus in term of the female psyche.

My question is why isn't there an Animus concept in the male psyche or an Anima concept in the female psyche?

Where is the archetype of the male part of the male unconscious and the female part of the female unconscious? Is that just another piece of the psyche the Jung defines as part of the Self? Where does the Animus live in the male total psyche?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Hi Ebrohman, You seem to be asking four different questions. Could you please narrow it down, because the questions, as is, will be difficult to answer, or the the answer will be extremely long. $\endgroup$ – Robin Kramer Nov 23 '16 at 8:13
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @RobinKramer the question is asking about the absence of a same sex anthropomorphic archetype, thats the crux of it. $\endgroup$ – ebrohman Nov 23 '16 at 13:21
2
$\begingroup$

From the way I understand it, everyone, male or female has both masculine and feminine personalities and it is up to the subjects whether they recognise that or not and to what level. The idea is that in order to become all you can be you need to integrate yourself with your inner opposite sex.

The animus within the woman and the anima within the man are the opposing personalities to their sex and how they are 'supposed' to behave. An example would be that if a man has a strongly developed anima (fully accepted and integrated into his psyche) the man will be fully open to emotionality.

The article from Wikipedia and this good article from Psychology Today may help.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This doesn't really address the question I asked. I could just as easily say, "The idea is that in order to become all you can be you need to integrate yourself with your inner same sex," which is true insofar as integrating with the opposite is true. The question is asking about the absence of a same-sex anthropomorphic archetype (save maybe...the Self). $\endgroup$ – ebrohman Nov 1 '16 at 20:54
2
$\begingroup$

I think that Jung probably felt that the Animus it the base of every man's psyche and that the Anima the base of every woman's psyche. You can have differences regarding how much of the other sex's psyche you have in you, but it's not necessary to speak about an Anima for women when it's just a "woman's psyche" and vice versa for men.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I think Jung believed the Self to be the base of the psyche, male or female. He liked to call it the "nucleus". $\endgroup$ – ebrohman Feb 22 '17 at 0:39
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I didn't know that but yet I can't see another reason for not mentioning Animus for men and Anima for women. $\endgroup$ – Rolexel Feb 22 '17 at 7:54
2
$\begingroup$

Jung outlines this pretty clearly in both Aion and Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious. I strongly recommend those books to anyone attempting to gain a deeper understanding of these concepts in particular. I found the first few chapters of Aion to be particularly enlightening.

There are many anthropomorphic symbols representing archetypes in the human psyche. The Hero and the Shadow are also two other principle figures. If you check out Jung's Symbols of Transformation, he outlines the Hero and a couple other principle archetypes in great detail.

The short answer to your questions is that every individual does have anthropomorphic representations of both psychological tones (i.e. masculine and feminine); but it is rather that the inferior form which has the same tone as you is referred to as your Shadow, while the inferior form of opposite tone is your Anima/Animus. So, for example, a man does not have an Animus, but one would find through psychoanalysis that his inferior masculine function consists of primary traits which he disdains regarding himself. This is a bit wonky wording in trying to be as honest to Jung as possible, and it would be more technically correct to assert that the symbols your Shadow occupies or manifests before you (in the case of the man) are characterized by anthropomorphic figures which have character traits which disgust you or which you detest. The Anima is then your central feminine figure and the thing responsible for your projects of 'love' and such things like that. The same is true mutatis mutandis for women.

New contributor
Ryan S. is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.