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I often see couples fight after sex. Why is this? Is there an actual biological effects (release of endorphins or other hormones) post-coitus (or post-orgasm) that would increase irritability in an individual?

I am trying to understand how it works and what neurons / recipes are involved in such experiences.

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    $\begingroup$ I think what you're asking is if there is any sort of biological process (release of endorphins or something) that would increase the aggression of both parties, thus increasing the likehood for an argument to occur? $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    Commented Aug 5, 2016 at 18:38
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    $\begingroup$ Framing the question in terms of the biological mechanisms and their potential affect on human cognition (instead of focusing on the outcome of this affect) would make this question much more answerable. Would you mind editing the question to change this focus? $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    Commented Aug 5, 2016 at 20:08
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    $\begingroup$ "I often see couples fight after sex." You watch couples after they've had sex? $\endgroup$
    – mrt
    Commented Aug 6, 2016 at 0:50
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    $\begingroup$ If you don't watch them after sex, how do you know they've just had sex (and are fighting because of it)? $\endgroup$
    – mrt
    Commented Aug 6, 2016 at 14:33
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    $\begingroup$ @Seanny123 I guess I was just trying to discern what empirical evidence (even if anecdotal) there was for post-coital fighting. Wasn't trying to accuse him of voyeurism! ;) We can speculate on a mechanism, but it's not clear how meaningful it would be if we don't have evidence that this actually happens. $\endgroup$
    – mrt
    Commented Aug 14, 2016 at 20:31

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