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What is the prevalence in the general population?

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    $\begingroup$ This is an interesting question, but could you provide any background to your question. What initial research have you done so far and why are you interested (personal or scientific relevance)? The more context you provide, the better we'll be able to answer your question. $\endgroup$ – Robin Kramer Jun 28 '16 at 14:32
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    $\begingroup$ Let me give you an example question of what would be perfect. This question clearly shows some background information that helps other people understand the topic and shows/convinces people why the topic is relevant. Also some hypotheses are provided that can be confirmed or disproven. The general question shows the level of expertise of the OP and the level of difficulty he wanted an answer. This resulted in a one-shot perfect answer that immediately hit the mark. Anything you do in the direction of that question would make yours better. $\endgroup$ – Robin Kramer Jun 28 '16 at 16:59
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    $\begingroup$ The website is not only about meeting your needs. It is about creating a knowledge database wherein other people may find the answers (as opposed to asking new questions). The more context you give the better people will be able the put the answers into perspective. Then, if the question/answer is not exactly what they were after, people can ask a new well defined question that supplements the first. Another benefit of more context to your questions, is that it makes people more willing to answer it. Please do not see this as an attack, it are mere tips to get better answers and content. $\endgroup$ – Robin Kramer Jun 28 '16 at 18:43
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    $\begingroup$ No, I hope that other people with the same question can find their answers in this one. And, what I said before, people must be willing to put effort in answering it. What helps thus is showing the relevance to them. The higher the quality of the question, the higher the quality of the answer will be, which will make both you and the community happy. $\endgroup$ – Robin Kramer Jun 28 '16 at 19:01
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    $\begingroup$ Which types of prevalence are you referring to? Which population are you referring to (unfortunately, "general" could mean many different things)? How do you distinguish "lifelong chronic depression" from "chronic depression"? I think that @Robin's suggestion of context may help provide some of these needed details (or allow others to infer), but if you prefer to be context independent, perhaps you would be willing to specify for users who wish to provide an answer to your question... $\endgroup$ – mfloren Jul 3 '16 at 17:08
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From Wikipedia, with dysthymia being another word for "chronic depression":

Globally dysthymia occurs in about 105 million people a year (1.5% of the population). It is slightly more common in women (1.8%) than in men (1.3%). The lifetime prevalence rate of dysthymia in community settings appears to range from 3 to 6% in the United States. However, in primary care settings the rate is higher ranging from 5 to 15 percent. United States prevalence rates tend to be somewhat higher than rates in other countries.

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  • $\begingroup$ That's a good start but not all lifelong depressibe episodes are considered dysthymia. $\endgroup$ – D J Sims Jul 3 '16 at 17:31
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    $\begingroup$ @DJSims, perhaps you could add in your question what you would consider as lifelong depression. Otherwise, more people have to keep guessing what you want, like mfloren did really nicely I must say. $\endgroup$ – Robin Kramer Jul 3 '16 at 19:32
  • $\begingroup$ Lifelong depression means lifelong depression lasting the entire life $\endgroup$ – D J Sims Jul 3 '16 at 21:04

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