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When memorizing a sentence or a full story: then, how does the brain encode the order of the words of the sentence or the sentences in the story?

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  • $\begingroup$ Would you mind elaborating how this question is different than your previous question on Neuronal differences of linguistic statements? $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    Jun 9, 2016 at 16:13
  • $\begingroup$ I am still reading the links of the SPA (semantic pointers architecture) you mentioned in the other topic. So, maybe diving deeper into SPA will answer this question as well. Though, this question is about how the brain can construct "meaningful sentences/stories" out of a "bunch of interconnected nodes within a net". $\endgroup$ Jun 9, 2016 at 19:07
  • $\begingroup$ I'm glad you're finding my resources useful. Feel free to email me if you have questions. $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    Jun 10, 2016 at 0:57
  • $\begingroup$ One year later, do you have anything to add to this question? $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    May 29, 2017 at 13:18

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Similar to your other question, this one reduces to "what are the neural mechanisms behind language?", which is very much a work in progress.

The only neural model of language that I currently know of is the Semantic Pointer Architecture (SPA), which is largely theoretical and only has some super basic examples.

Basically, the SPA represents language as vector manipulation. The vectors are represented in neurons using the Neural Engineering Framework.

For more details on how this is done, check out "How to Build a Brain" by Chris Eliasmith and the work by Peter Blouw who is trying to solve part of this problem with his PhD thesis.

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