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Is there a relation between "declarative vs. procedural memory" and "substantive vs. verb"? For example, are substantives (as a kind of information entities) stored in the declarative memory whereas verbs define capabilities/behavior and hence stored in the procedural memory?

Example:

Tree: a substantive, can directly be stored in declarative memory

to climb: a verb, defines a capability/behavior and can be stored in the procedural memory

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While it's true that universal nouns will link mostly to other universal nouns (a tree is a plant), and universal verbs will link mostly to other universal verbs (to climb is to move), it is not necessary that they be in separate memory areas from each other; or even that they be separate from event memory (one cat did climb one tree). The most efficient memory scheme would minimize the length of all links. One way would be to store all new memories in a fairly linear structure, and then use an off-line process (sleep) to spread them around to minimize total link lengths {or to optimize lengths around importance of fast access}.

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