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Nerves can detect pressure, temperature, light (eyes), sound, friction- at least. Does each sensation have its own neurotransmitter?

I'm only a little familiar with neurotransmitters. This page pretty well sums up what I know about neurotransmitters.

So it seems like its a combination of neurotransmitters that flow from any single perception area.

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    $\begingroup$ Within the traditional 5 senses only in smell, and possibly to a limited extent touch, are nerves the detectors. $\endgroup$ – StrongBad Feb 4 '16 at 19:30
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No. For example, the neurotransmitter at the first stage of auditory processing (the inner hair cell VII cranial nerve synapse) and visual processing (rod and cone synapses with a bipolar cells) is glutamate.

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There are neurotransmitters that are associated with specific functions within a neural circuit, but I would not associate a specific neurotransmitter with a specific sensation. There is also more complexity to this, because there is a plenty of receptors for each neurotransmitter. These receptors have slightly different properties, which may influence the effect on the post-synaptic neuron and consequently the percept. Another concept is the effect of neuromodulators that regulate larger areas of the brain, e.g. noradrenaline, or serotonin. These have broad effects that change the brain state and are associated with a certain 'feeling'. For example, release of noradrenaline would lead to higher ventilation, higher heart rate, sweating etc.

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