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I'd like to know if the human to human interface carry the same information from the brain or it is just a signal that switch on or off electrical impulses that causes the limb to contract?

Is it even possible to take someone else signal coming from the brain and redirect to somebody else where the other person can use it for the same result or is it always going to be digital type On or OFF and not analog?

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  • $\begingroup$ Redirection is equivalent to routing. Digital vs. analogue is a hardware decision. Is your question about the hardware behind this product? Or how decisions in this product were made? I'm having a bit of a hard time narrowing down your question. (: $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    Nov 2, 2015 at 16:39
  • $\begingroup$ yeah, I'm trying to understand what kind of signal gets carried over from one person to another and what role this signal play in the human body. $\endgroup$
    – Grasper
    Nov 2, 2015 at 19:58
  • $\begingroup$ So how much do you understand of how the device work? Do you understand EEG? Do you understand how to manipulate muscles using electrical impulse? $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    Nov 9, 2015 at 2:33
  • $\begingroup$ I understand electronics and I have some idea of how the biology works. I haven't done any tests so all my knowledge is on a theoretical level. I'm trying to see if locating specific nerves designated for speech could be carried over from one human to the other and this way help a person improve his speech abilities. If the device is only able to transfer one type of data whether to contract or not, I doubt this will be ever possible. Well, I'm sure it must be possible. Maybe getting more people involved could find the solution. $\endgroup$
    – Grasper
    Nov 9, 2015 at 16:29
  • $\begingroup$ That sounds like a totally different, but interesting, question. If you did a bit of research about human speech formation and added that knowledge to an introduction of your question, I would definitely upvote it! $\endgroup$
    – Seanny123
    Nov 9, 2015 at 16:32

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The answer for the particular interface that you linked to is that a single scalar variable is being passed. The EMG activity in one person controls an electrical signal that is connected to a nerve in the second person, which when activated causes the muscle to contract. The EMG activity is thresholded and then the binary information of whether or not it passes that threshold is passed to a "TENS unit" whose output can be controlled in an analog way.

While the actual information being passed in this demonstration is binary, there is no reason why it must be so. It is simply a result of the design decisions the creators made.

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  • $\begingroup$ so is it exactly the same analog signal coming from one person going into the second person? Or the second person is receiving completely different analog signal? $\endgroup$
    – Grasper
    Nov 16, 2015 at 21:19
  • $\begingroup$ No. An analog signal comes from the first person, goes through a threshold to convert to a binary on or off value, and then is turned into an electrical signal the amplitude of which can be controlled with an analog dial. Try watching the video. They have a pretty good description there. $\endgroup$
    – honi
    Nov 16, 2015 at 21:25
  • $\begingroup$ I suppose that technically the information being passed from the one person to the other in this demonstration is not analog. It is a digital signal the amplitude of which can be controlled in an analog way. $\endgroup$
    – honi
    Nov 16, 2015 at 21:26
  • $\begingroup$ I have edited my answer to clarify that. $\endgroup$
    – honi
    Nov 16, 2015 at 21:28
  • $\begingroup$ thanks. I would be interested what will happen if one person is connected directly without any device or at least a device that won't convert the signal. Would the second person be receiving signals that causes the perfect movement of his hand? $\endgroup$
    – Grasper
    Nov 16, 2015 at 21:53

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