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There is much information regarding learning styles and ways to leverage them, along with boosting focus, alertness and concentration.

However, I'm looking for accompanying information that would be useful in addition to those answers.

Witnessed countless times:
When one is either learning or working with a new concept that is - complex, untangle, counter-intuitive, tedious, multi-dimensional, boring and difficult, it appears mood is altered to a lower state, very similar to that of a depressive state, however is temporary, until another concepts comes along (still new) that is simple, clear and straight forward.

Are there any studies that show correlation to dopamine and serotonin in such a case - and more importantly, are there any studies or know methods that reverse this, causing instead increased dopamine and serotonin during such events?

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    $\begingroup$ For serotonin: 1. eat food with plenty of tryptophan, e.g. eggs. 2. Add some vitamin B6, which helps to produce serotonin from tryptophan. 3. Maybe add a herbal SSRI, like St. John's wort... $\endgroup$ – draks ... Oct 19 '15 at 9:51
  • $\begingroup$ @draks: Does this just move the same process to a different relative baseline (higher level to start with but still goes down at that moment?) $\endgroup$ – Greg McNulty Nov 5 '15 at 0:50
  • $\begingroup$ Looks like. Maybe you could try to get friend with your complex, untangle, counter-intuitive, tedious, multi-dimensional, boring and difficult task... $\endgroup$ – draks ... Nov 5 '15 at 6:41
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    $\begingroup$ A much better question would be to ask how to learn better. $\endgroup$ – jona Dec 13 '15 at 13:13
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    $\begingroup$ @GregMcNulty en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amphetamine#Enhancing_performance ;) $\endgroup$ – Matas Vaitkevicius Dec 14 '15 at 11:55
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When one is either learning or working with a new concept that is - complex, untangle, counter-intuitive, tedious, multi-dimensional, boring and difficult, it appears mood is altered to a lower state, very similar to that of a depressive state, however is temporary, until another concepts comes along (still new) that is simple, clear and straight forward.

Are there any studies that show correlation to dopamine and serotonin in such a case

Yes, there are studies that suggest that failure can lead to reduced dopamine and seratonin. Essentially, dopamine production is argued to be produced by reward [1]. One type of reward is success at at something. By extension, where there is no success, less dopamine is therefore produced. As dopamine provides energy and a motivation to act [1] individuals have less motivation and energy. Further, in parallel more they may produce more cortisol, leading to a them developing a depressive state [e.g., 2]

more importantly, are there any studies or know methods that reverse this, causing instead increased dopamine and serotonin during such events?

Yes, there are some known methods that you can use to increase serotonin/dopamine before/during these sorts of events:

  1. Break down the task so that you get a dopamine boost everytime you get one part done [e.g., 1]
  2. Manage your expectations - much of reward is about expectations. If you want to be better than before when doing something, as opposed to be the best, then you are much more likely to find something rewarding, and produce more dopamine [4].
  3. Listen to music - in some cases this can raise dopamine levels to ensure that you have sufficient motivation to work [3]
  4. Consume substances that will increase dopamine( e.g., st. johns wort) or dopamines precursors (e.g., Tyrosine).
  5. This article provides a set of potentially useful approaches that may be of use for increasing dopamine. However, before adopting them I would investigate the literature cited[4].
  6. Exercise prior to the task [5]

I am happy to clarify or expand on any part of this answer if you want, so just let me know.

[1] Hoebel, B. G., Rada, P. V., Mark, G. P. and Pothos, E. N. (1999) 'Neural systems for reinforcement and inhibition of behavior: Relevance to eating, addiction, and depression'.

[2] https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201301/cortisol-why-the-stress-hormone-is-public-enemy-no-1

[3] Salimpoor, V. N., Benovoy, M., Larcher, K., Dagher, A. and Zatorre, R. J. (2011) 'Anatomically distinct dopamine release during anticipation and experience of peak emotion to music', Nat Neurosci, 14(2), 257-262.

[4]https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201112/the-neuroscience-perseverance

[5] Young, S. N. (2007). "How to increase serotonin in the human brain without drugs." Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience : JPN 32(6): 394-399.

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I'm guessing you don't want to generally increase the level of those chemicals in the brain, just in the reward-motivation area.
In order to do so, you need to be rewarded and motivated, obviously. The learning need to be exciting, with feedback and reinforcement. Socializing it will help, too.
There is a relatively new topic, called gameificatin, that try to do exactly that. It's the process of making the learning a game, so we can learn better,based on the reward-motivation effects.
In my opinion, there is no "hacking" the brain. Doing so is using drugs, and there is a price tag for that. If you want to use the normal brain pathways, there are no shortcuts.

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    $\begingroup$ Not just money price tag. One demolishes the mental health instantly when consuming drugs. $\endgroup$ – neverMind9 Apr 23 '18 at 17:25
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This is more of a subjective opinion, (though there are some real world examples) but I feel that the concept of "gamification" (adding game-like qualities to non-gaming tasks) is quite relevant to this topic. Sites like khan academy or codecademy use this pretty effectively, and make the process of learning math or code more enjoyable because you are making small incremental achievements that would otherwise be invisible or ignored while learning through another medium. On another note, working with a friend or a group of friends to learn something complex seems to increase my level of enjoyment while studying the topic because the task is now cooperative and competitive simultaneously. You learn from the mistakes of others while getting different interpretations of complex ideas. The task becomes more of an adventure as you motivate each other to see just how much you can learn and aspire to show off what you know with new ideas.

Most of this is purely anecdotal, so I'll look for studies to confirm or deny these ideas.

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