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Self-compassion is often compared with self-esteem and it seems that self-compassion is more effective and positive than self-esteem. A lot of studies have shown that excessive levels of self-esteem might lead to narcissism or to believe that we are above average. However, I haven't heard negative aspects about self-compassion? Self-compassion is related to happiness, satisfaction and motivation but does it have any negative consequence? Thank you.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Josh Jun 29 '15 at 1:51

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ I feel that, as it is currently written, this question is too vague and doesn't have enough of a basis in cognitive science as written. Can you reword it to make it more research driven? $\endgroup$ – Josh Jun 29 '15 at 1:53
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This is only my own experience, but for many years I had no self-esteem and did things that were harmful to myself. It wasn't until I started thinking objectively about myself as a child that I could be compassionate towards her that I began to feel better. She still lives within me, but the memories no longer rule me. I went on from there to myself at different ages, forgiving myself as I went along. Finally I started asking myself, "If you could, what would you want to do." After the answer to that I was able to realize some of the dreams that I'd thought were impossible for me. I'm not saying that I'm the perfect picture of mental health now, but am I certainly finding it easier to live with myself, and I am generally happier. I still need to take antidepressants to keep me on a level, but everything is better than I ever imagined it could be, even with medication. I never could afford the specialist, so I had to do my own. However, I don't think they could have done it better. I'm still working on it and I'm 71, but happy.

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I know this is not a very scientific answer but as for most of the Social and mental properties the normal is determined by the Common properties of individuals are determined by the Common properties of individuals in society. There is, I suspect, a different level of self esteem acceptable in different social groups. The unusually high ones may possibly be punished by society.

My personal opinion is very high and very low levels of self esteem May hurt objectivity. But again, can this be considered a harm? I don't know that.

We may see examples of penalties of high self esteem in highly successful people. Even in our daily lives are can see examples of people of higher autority to claim to know things that they actually don't. Perhaps Adolf Hitler is a historical example of that.to know things that they actually don't.

We can see examples off his eeen in the scientfic world. The phenomenon known as Nobel disease shows brilliant scientists may also talk about things outside of their fields. More information at this link Nobel disease

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