3 replaced http://cogsci.stackexchange.com/ with https://cogsci.stackexchange.com/
source | link

However, I could easily see your hypothesis being falsified for good reasons. While it's true that people's personalities affect their choices of situations to which they expose themselves (e.g., Beck & Clark, 2009), many of the situations people find themselves in are certainly not chosen. Situations can thus operate independently of preexisting personality characteristics in affecting attitudes (e.g., McShane, 2009; see also the first figure in this answerthis answer depicting influences of both personality and external factors on attitudes).

However, I could easily see your hypothesis being falsified for good reasons. While it's true that people's personalities affect their choices of situations to which they expose themselves (e.g., Beck & Clark, 2009), many of the situations people find themselves in are certainly not chosen. Situations can thus operate independently of preexisting personality characteristics in affecting attitudes (e.g., McShane, 2009; see also the first figure in this answer depicting influences of both personality and external factors on attitudes).

However, I could easily see your hypothesis being falsified for good reasons. While it's true that people's personalities affect their choices of situations to which they expose themselves (e.g., Beck & Clark, 2009), many of the situations people find themselves in are certainly not chosen. Situations can thus operate independently of preexisting personality characteristics in affecting attitudes (e.g., McShane, 2009; see also the first figure in this answer depicting influences of both personality and external factors on attitudes).

2 slight elaboration
source | link

However, I could easily see your hypothesis being falsified for good reasons. While it's true that people's personalities affect their choices of situations to which they expose themselves (e.g., Beck & Clark, 2009), many of the situations people find themselves in are certainly not chosen. Situations can thus operate independently of preexisting personality characteristics in affecting attitudes (e.g., McShane, 2009); see also the first figure in this answer depicting influences of both personality and external factors on attitudes).

However, I could easily see your hypothesis being falsified for good reasons. While it's true that people's personalities affect their choices of situations to which they expose themselves (e.g., Beck & Clark, 2009), many of the situations people find themselves in are certainly not chosen. Situations can thus operate independently of preexisting personality characteristics in affecting attitudes (e.g., McShane, 2009).

However, I could easily see your hypothesis being falsified for good reasons. While it's true that people's personalities affect their choices of situations to which they expose themselves (e.g., Beck & Clark, 2009), many of the situations people find themselves in are certainly not chosen. Situations can thus operate independently of preexisting personality characteristics in affecting attitudes (e.g., McShane, 2009; see also the first figure in this answer depicting influences of both personality and external factors on attitudes).

1
source | link

To build on @ChuckSherrington's answer, I agree that what you're hypothesizing is essentially an application of reaction formation theory. I don't know if your particular applications have been studied, but the reaction formation process in general has been researched and supported (Baumeister, Dale, & Sommer, 1998). Self-deception is one of many factors that distinguishes implicit from explicit motivation (see also McClelland, Koestner, & Weinberger, 1989; Emmons & McAdams, 1991). Reaction formation seems a likely marker of self-deception in cases where implicit and explicit motives conflict...especially if the reaction formation involves complaining! Concordance among various kinds of motives (implicit, explicit, goals, values, strivings, etc.) is important for well-being (e.g., Job, Langens, & Brandstätter, 2009), so expressing negative attitudes like in your examples might be a sign of negative affect elevated by internal conflict.

However, I could easily see your hypothesis being falsified for good reasons. While it's true that people's personalities affect their choices of situations to which they expose themselves (e.g., Beck & Clark, 2009), many of the situations people find themselves in are certainly not chosen. Situations can thus operate independently of preexisting personality characteristics in affecting attitudes (e.g., McShane, 2009).

More concretely speaking, it seems likely that many people who "hate drama" feel this way because they can't avoid it, regardless of whether they're actually trying. For instance, my personal experience with "drama" has probably increased due to indirect consequences of choices I've made based on entirely different motives, such as trying to save money by living with several roommates in cheap housing. Those experiences certainly taught me a new level of hatred for drama that now compels me to avoid living with roommates, but I'd sooner say I chose those experiences to avoid financial drama than to test my luck with social drama. Even at the times of those decisions (i.e., even before learning my new level of drama hatred), I recall feeling aversion to the social consequences of my financially driven decisions, not some guilty hint of secret excitement. This is anecdotal of course, but conversations with friends and colleagues lead me to believe my experiences weren't unrepresentative of typical roommate drama.

References

- Baumeister, R. F., Dale, K., & Sommer, K. L. (1998). Freudian defense mechanisms and empirical findings in modern social psychology: Reaction formation, projection, displacement, undoing, isolation, sublimation, and denial. Journal of Personality, 66(6), 1081–1124. Retrieved from http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/vollarj/baumesiter%20roy%20-%20freudian%20defense%20mechanisms.pdf.
- Beck, L. A., & Clark, M. S. (2009). Choosing to enter or avoid diagnostic social situations. Psychological Science, 20(9), 1175–1181.
- Emmons, R. A., & McAdams, D. P. (1991). Personal strivings and motive dispositions: Exploring the links. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 17(6), 648–654.
- Job, V., Langens, T. A., & Brandstätter, V. (2009). Effects of achievement goal striving on well-being: The moderating role of the explicit achievement motive. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35(8), 983-996. Retrieved from http://www.researchgate.net/publication/26268289_Effects_of_achievement_goal_striving_on_well-being_the_moderating_role_of_the_explicit_achievement_motive/file/3deec5279fa74c183e.pdf.
- McClelland, D. C., Koestner, R., & Weinberger, J. (1989). How do self-attributed and implicit motives differ? Psychological Review, 96(4), 690–702. Retrieved from http://lab4.psico.unimib.it/nettuno/forum/free_download/mcclelland_89_355.pdf.
- McShane, S. L. (2009). Organizational behavior, 7th ed. (pp. 106). McGraw-Hill. Retrieved from http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/dl/free/0070876940/355897/sample_ch04.pdf.