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One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe just having fresh food in the early parts of one's gastrointestinal tract; I'm not sure) activates the PNS, which itself has soporific effects.

Also, a separate quote from the Hypoglycemic Health Association relating starvation to adrenaline production [emphasis added]:

When the brain is threatened with energy starvation it will send a hormonal message to the adrenal glands to pour adrenaline into the system. Adrenaline is a hormone that converts glycogen – strings of glucose molecules stored in the body – back into glucose, so as to feed the brain again. (See image). But abnormal adrenaline secretion during the night can also cause insomnia and nightmares...

If we are able to supply the body with all the nutrients, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins and minerals, it will have all the ingredients to synthesize the necessary neurotransmitters and hormones that can make us feel happy and content when we should. A natural diet should provide us with all the components to build the necessary serotonin and melatonin to enable us to sleep.

This is from "The Biochemistry of Insomnia," which may interest you more broadly, but I think I've quoted most of the content that pertains directly to diet here.

Edit: BTW, you might also find this question of interest (I've answered it somewhat similarly):
http://cogsci.stackexchange.com/q/5263/4086https://cogsci.stackexchange.com/q/5263/4086

One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe just having fresh food in the early parts of one's gastrointestinal tract; I'm not sure) activates the PNS, which itself has soporific effects.

Also, a separate quote from the Hypoglycemic Health Association relating starvation to adrenaline production [emphasis added]:

When the brain is threatened with energy starvation it will send a hormonal message to the adrenal glands to pour adrenaline into the system. Adrenaline is a hormone that converts glycogen – strings of glucose molecules stored in the body – back into glucose, so as to feed the brain again. (See image). But abnormal adrenaline secretion during the night can also cause insomnia and nightmares...

If we are able to supply the body with all the nutrients, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins and minerals, it will have all the ingredients to synthesize the necessary neurotransmitters and hormones that can make us feel happy and content when we should. A natural diet should provide us with all the components to build the necessary serotonin and melatonin to enable us to sleep.

This is from "The Biochemistry of Insomnia," which may interest you more broadly, but I think I've quoted most of the content that pertains directly to diet here.

Edit: BTW, you might also find this question of interest (I've answered it somewhat similarly):
http://cogsci.stackexchange.com/q/5263/4086

One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe just having fresh food in the early parts of one's gastrointestinal tract; I'm not sure) activates the PNS, which itself has soporific effects.

Also, a separate quote from the Hypoglycemic Health Association relating starvation to adrenaline production [emphasis added]:

When the brain is threatened with energy starvation it will send a hormonal message to the adrenal glands to pour adrenaline into the system. Adrenaline is a hormone that converts glycogen – strings of glucose molecules stored in the body – back into glucose, so as to feed the brain again. (See image). But abnormal adrenaline secretion during the night can also cause insomnia and nightmares...

If we are able to supply the body with all the nutrients, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins and minerals, it will have all the ingredients to synthesize the necessary neurotransmitters and hormones that can make us feel happy and content when we should. A natural diet should provide us with all the components to build the necessary serotonin and melatonin to enable us to sleep.

This is from "The Biochemistry of Insomnia," which may interest you more broadly, but I think I've quoted most of the content that pertains directly to diet here.

Edit: BTW, you might also find this question of interest (I've answered it somewhat similarly):
https://cogsci.stackexchange.com/q/5263/4086

2 mentioned other relevant question
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One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe just having fresh food in the early parts of one's gastrointestinal tract; I'm not sure) activates the PNS, which itself has soporific effects.

Also, a separate quote from the Hypoglycemic Health Association relating starvation to adrenaline production [emphasis added]:

When the brain is threatened with energy starvation it will send a hormonal message to the adrenal glands to pour adrenaline into the system. Adrenaline is a hormone that converts glycogen – strings of glucose molecules stored in the body – back into glucose, so as to feed the brain again. (See image). But abnormal adrenaline secretion during the night can also cause insomnia and nightmares...

If we are able to supply the body with all the nutrients, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins and minerals, it will have all the ingredients to synthesize the necessary neurotransmitters and hormones that can make us feel happy and content when we should. A natural diet should provide us with all the components to build the necessary serotonin and melatonin to enable us to sleep.

This is from "The Biochemistry of Insomnia," which may interest you more broadly, but I think I've quoted most of the content that pertains directly to diet here.

Edit: BTW, you might also find this question of interest (I've answered it somewhat similarly):
http://cogsci.stackexchange.com/q/5263/4086

One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe just having fresh food in the early parts of one's gastrointestinal tract; I'm not sure) activates the PNS, which itself has soporific effects.

Also, a separate quote from the Hypoglycemic Health Association relating starvation to adrenaline production [emphasis added]:

When the brain is threatened with energy starvation it will send a hormonal message to the adrenal glands to pour adrenaline into the system. Adrenaline is a hormone that converts glycogen – strings of glucose molecules stored in the body – back into glucose, so as to feed the brain again. (See image). But abnormal adrenaline secretion during the night can also cause insomnia and nightmares...

If we are able to supply the body with all the nutrients, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins and minerals, it will have all the ingredients to synthesize the necessary neurotransmitters and hormones that can make us feel happy and content when we should. A natural diet should provide us with all the components to build the necessary serotonin and melatonin to enable us to sleep.

This is from "The Biochemistry of Insomnia," which may interest you more broadly, but I think I've quoted most of the content that pertains directly to diet here.

One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe just having fresh food in the early parts of one's gastrointestinal tract; I'm not sure) activates the PNS, which itself has soporific effects.

Also, a separate quote from the Hypoglycemic Health Association relating starvation to adrenaline production [emphasis added]:

When the brain is threatened with energy starvation it will send a hormonal message to the adrenal glands to pour adrenaline into the system. Adrenaline is a hormone that converts glycogen – strings of glucose molecules stored in the body – back into glucose, so as to feed the brain again. (See image). But abnormal adrenaline secretion during the night can also cause insomnia and nightmares...

If we are able to supply the body with all the nutrients, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins and minerals, it will have all the ingredients to synthesize the necessary neurotransmitters and hormones that can make us feel happy and content when we should. A natural diet should provide us with all the components to build the necessary serotonin and melatonin to enable us to sleep.

This is from "The Biochemistry of Insomnia," which may interest you more broadly, but I think I've quoted most of the content that pertains directly to diet here.

Edit: BTW, you might also find this question of interest (I've answered it somewhat similarly):
http://cogsci.stackexchange.com/q/5263/4086

1
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One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe just having fresh food in the early parts of one's gastrointestinal tract; I'm not sure) activates the PNS, which itself has soporific effects.

Also, a separate quote from the Hypoglycemic Health Association relating starvation to adrenaline production [emphasis added]:

When the brain is threatened with energy starvation it will send a hormonal message to the adrenal glands to pour adrenaline into the system. Adrenaline is a hormone that converts glycogen – strings of glucose molecules stored in the body – back into glucose, so as to feed the brain again. (See image). But abnormal adrenaline secretion during the night can also cause insomnia and nightmares...

If we are able to supply the body with all the nutrients, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins and minerals, it will have all the ingredients to synthesize the necessary neurotransmitters and hormones that can make us feel happy and content when we should. A natural diet should provide us with all the components to build the necessary serotonin and melatonin to enable us to sleep.

This is from "The Biochemistry of Insomnia," which may interest you more broadly, but I think I've quoted most of the content that pertains directly to diet here.