5 deleted 69 characters in body
source | link

When both keep silent they can only be sentenced on minor charges because of a lack of proof (say a sentence of just 1 yearsyear).

Now - to come to your question - you talk about 'betrayal' (which is probably referring to 'confessing') and cooperation (probably referring to 'holding silent'). You have to realize that keeping silent means you have to know that the other person will (likely) do that too. In a one-shot situation you cannot know. However, it is only when the game is repeatedly performed, and when the subjects can learn the behavior of their 'accomplice' that subjects start to make educated guesses. A particularly fruitful strategy, surprisingly, in a repeated game is the 'tit-for-tat' approach, an almost childish approach to the dilemma, where people cooperate with their partner on the first round, then adjust their behavior to match your partner’s, as in, you do to them what they just did to you. It is a more selfish tactic than the golden remain silent approach would prescribe. If, reciprocally, your partner cooperatescooperated (staysstayed silent) the last time, you continuealso choose to cooperate (stay silent too); this time; if they defectdefected (confessconfessed) last time, you respond in kind by immediately retaliating (confessing) against them (source: Seltzer in Psychology Today, 2016).

When both keep silent they can only be sentenced on minor charges because of a lack of proof (say 1 years).

Now - to come to your question - you talk about 'betrayal' (which is probably referring to 'confessing') and cooperation (probably referring to 'holding silent'). You have to realize that keeping silent means you have to know that the other person will (likely) do that too. In a one-shot situation you cannot know. However, it is only when the game is repeatedly performed, and when the subjects can learn the behavior of their 'accomplice' that subjects start to make educated guesses. A particularly fruitful strategy, surprisingly, in a repeated game is the 'tit-for-tat' approach, an almost childish approach to the dilemma, where people cooperate with their partner on the first round, then adjust their behavior to match your partner’s, as in, you do to them what they just did to you. It is a more selfish tactic than the golden remain silent approach would prescribe. If, reciprocally, your partner cooperates (stays silent), you continue to cooperate (stay silent too); if they defect (confess), you respond in kind by immediately retaliating (confessing) against them (source: Seltzer in Psychology Today, 2016).

When both keep silent they can only be sentenced on minor charges because of a lack of proof (say a sentence of just 1 year).

Now - to come to your question - you talk about 'betrayal' (which is probably referring to 'confessing') and cooperation (probably referring to 'holding silent'). You have to realize that keeping silent means you have to know that the other person will (likely) do that too. In a one-shot situation you cannot know. However, it is only when the game is repeatedly performed, and when the subjects can learn the behavior of their 'accomplice' that subjects start to make educated guesses. A particularly fruitful strategy, surprisingly, in a repeated game is the 'tit-for-tat' approach, an almost childish approach to the dilemma, where people cooperate with their partner on the first round, then adjust their behavior to match your partner’s, as in, you do to them what they just did to you. If your partner cooperated (stayed silent) the last time, you also choose to cooperate (stay silent too) this time; if they defected (confessed) last time, you respond in kind by retaliating (confessing) against them (source: Seltzer in Psychology Today, 2016).

4 deleted 4 characters in body
source | link

Background
The prisoners’ dilemma is about cooperation and competition and applies to the social settings, business and politics. In the traditional version of the game, the police have arrested two suspects A and B. Both were involved in he same crime and they are interrogated separately. The police offers A and B to confess and by doing so giving away the accomplice, or to keep silent (source: Library of Economics & Liberty).

Background
The prisoners’ dilemma is about cooperation and competition and applies to the social settings, business and politics. In the traditional version of the game, the police have arrested two suspects A and B. Both were involved in he same crime and they are interrogated separately. The police offers A and B to confess and by doing so giving away the accomplice, or to keep silent (source: Library of Economics & Liberty).

Background
The prisoners’ dilemma is about cooperation and competition and applies to social settings, business and politics. In the traditional version of the game, the police have arrested two suspects A and B. Both were involved in he same crime and they are interrogated separately. The police offers A and B to confess and by doing so giving away the accomplice, or to keep silent (source: Library of Economics & Liberty).

3 added 459 characters in body
source | link

Short'Short' answer
The way people respond to the prisoner's dilemma strongly depends on how the experiment is set up. In a repeated game, where the same 'prisoners' meet each other multiple times, the tit-for-tat strategy seems to be favored. This, because contenders learn the other's behavior and start anticipating the choice from their opponent to manipulate the outcome. It is not so that people by default betray their opponent. The betrayal (confession) is the selfish option and is favorable when you have no idea what the other will do, as it will always work in favor of yourself. The cooperation (keeping silent) is the most risky one and you only do that when you like to take big risks (unlikely, most people don't), or when you have a fairly good idea what your opponent will do.

Short answer
The way people respond to the prisoner's dilemma strongly depends on how the experiment is set up. In a repeated game, where the same 'prisoners' meet each other multiple times, the tit-for-tat strategy seems to be favored. This, because contenders learn the other's behavior and start anticipating the choice from their opponent to manipulate the outcome. It is not so that people by default betray their opponent.

'Short' answer
The way people respond to the prisoner's dilemma strongly depends on how the experiment is set up. In a repeated game, where the same 'prisoners' meet each other multiple times, the tit-for-tat strategy seems to be favored. This, because contenders learn the other's behavior and start anticipating the choice from their opponent to manipulate the outcome. It is not so that people by default betray their opponent. The betrayal (confession) is the selfish option and is favorable when you have no idea what the other will do, as it will always work in favor of yourself. The cooperation (keeping silent) is the most risky one and you only do that when you like to take big risks (unlikely, most people don't), or when you have a fairly good idea what your opponent will do.

2 added 459 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link